Ernst & Young, threats & intimidation

Ernst & Young, threats & intimidation

Yet another explanation needed by Ernst & Young … In the words of a renowned Australian xenophobe, please explain, Ernst & Young. First, you employ an Indigenous Australian man (aka ‘Pat’) to work in your Canberra office, having sourced him through your own recruiting head-hunter Tanya Taylor. He leaves of his own accord to return to the ACT Public Service. During his first tenure as an ACT Public Servant he ...

Read More »
Anzac Day: Lest we forget

Anzac Day: Lest we forget

There is a battle going on in this country, one the majority would rather ignore. It is a battle for equality between anything to marks a person as not conforming to the mainstream. Like any war, the boundaries keep moving as allies are formed and concessions are made. We are, as a society nominally convinced of the right of each person to equal treatment, but when it comes to the ...

Read More »
Kieffen Raggett: A victim of the racist fog blurring Australia's consciousness

Kieffen Raggett: A victim of the racist fog blurring Australia’s consciousness

AQUÍ Mis pasos en esta calle Resuenan En otra calle Donde Oigo mis pasos Pasar en esta calle Donde Sólo es real la niebla. Octavio Paz – March 31, 1914 – April 19, 1998 was a Mexican writer, poet, and diplomat, and the winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize for Literature. Here My footsteps in the street Re-echo In another street Where I hear my footsteps Passing in this street ...

Read More »
The Hunger Games, contemporary spin on ancient tale

The Hunger Games, contemporary spin on ancient tale

My mind has been drawn to another of Rilke’s poems – Dreaming: This my labour: crowned by desire to wander the paths of days. Then sturdied, strong, send rootlet streamers down deep into life as I may — and through its pain mature far beyond it, and long past the end of time. I treated myself today to a luxury I rarely allow myself – a trip to the cinema, ...

Read More »
Ernst and Young peddlers of falsity, destroyers of dreams

Ernst and Young peddlers of falsity, destroyers of dreams

Had I the heavens’ embroidered cloths, Enwrought of golden and silver light, The blue and the dim and the dark cloths Of night and light and the half-light, I would lay these cloths under your feet: But I, being poor, have only my dreams; I have spread my dreams under your feet; Tread softly because you tread on my dreams. Aedh wishes for the cloths of heaven, W.B. Yeats. Many, ...

Read More »
Media, racism and manipulation

Media, racism and manipulation

Media have divided the working class and stereotyped young African-American males as gangsters or drug dealers. As a result of such treatment, the media have crushed youths’ prospects for future employment and advancement. The media have focused on the negative aspects of the black community (e.g. engaging in drug use, criminal activity, welfare abuse) while maintaining the cycle of poverty that the elite wants. Balkaran, S., 1999, The Yale Political ...

Read More »
Mob rule and the ‘gentle’ nations of the West

Mob rule and the ‘gentle’ nations of the West

You can talk a mob into anything; its feelings may be – usually are – on the whole generous and right; but it has no foundation for them; you may tease or tickle it into any, at your pleasure; it thinks by infection, for the most part, catching an opinion like a cold, and there is nothing so little that it will not roar itself wild about, when the fit ...

Read More »
Why Australia needs a Royal Commission into the AFP

Why Australia needs a Royal Commission into the AFP

On August 30 last year Blak and Black lodged a petition on the GoPetition website calling for a Royal Commission into the Australian Federal Police (“AFP”). Blak and Black has set out in detail the reasons why we believe a Royal Commission into the AFP is necessary. Without going into the minutiae of the issues raised by Blak and Black in its petition preamble, they all revolve around a core ...

Read More »
Vice-regal corruption: Australia and the UNSC

Vice-regal corruption: Australia and the UNSC

The Samoan Government has announced that Australian Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, will visit the country next week as part of a Pacific tour that also includes Nauru, Kiribati, Tuvalu, the Solomon Islands and New Caledonia. Ms Bryce will address Samoa’s parliament and call on Samoa’s head of state, Tui Atua Tupua Tamasese Efi. Her two days in Samoa has also been scheduled for a visit to SENESE, a school for people ...

Read More »
West Papua and the United Nations

West Papua and the United Nations

July of 1969 was a big month. Whilst the ‘civilized’ world was focused on the deployment of three men to the moon, Indonesia was finalizing steps to wrest control of the territory of West Papua from the United Nations, the former Dutch protectorate. I do not say wrest lightly, for it was in the so-called Act of Free Choice that in fact the people of West Papua were robbed of ...

Read More »
Aboriginal and White Australia: How The Cultures Clashed

Aboriginal and White Australia: How The Cultures Clashed

This post has been proferred by Imogen, a reader of Blak and Black. When the members of the First Fleet stepped off their cruise ships and on to Australian soil back in 1788, things changed forever. A group of Brits, convicts, sailors and officers, stepped off those ships after their arduous eight-month journey, and into the unknown. There were 1000 of them, plus animals, and each one of them was entirely alien ...

Read More »
The great Aussie sporting culture’s hidden racist agenda

The great Aussie sporting culture’s hidden racist agenda

This post was penned in an outburst of indignation this morning after reading an article in the Sydney Morning Herald titled AFL clubs’ unwritten rule on Aborigines which discusses the AFL’s racist polices regarding Aboriginal recruitment. It draws some interesting parallels between the AFL, the ACT Government and Ernst & Young. I was going to title this post “asinus asino, et sus sui pulcher” but on reflection I guessed that the ...

Read More »
Ways You Can Fight Racism

Ways You Can Fight Racism

We like to think that we are now living in an enlightened era where racism is a thing of the past. While things have gotten better for minority groups in the United States, it doesn’t take a degree in humanities to see that racism is still a big problem in our society. There may not be as many instances of overt racism or violence against minorities as there were fifty or sixty years ago, but ...

Read More »
An ‘Ethics Commissioner’ without ethics: welcome to Australia

An ‘Ethics Commissioner’ without ethics: welcome to Australia

Yesterday, Thursday I received a phone call from Captain Fred Martens, the man who spent a 1,000 days in jail, having been wrongly convicted of an offence under Australia’s Child Sex Tourism Laws. His conviction was later quashed by the Queensland Court of Appeal (“QCA”). At all times Captain Martens has maintained his innocence. Captain Martens has further maintained that he was a victim of a corrupt Australian Federal Police ...

Read More »
Theft and racism, the festering sores in Canberra

Theft and racism, the festering sores in Canberra

For some years now I have been considering the concept of complicity. What constitutes complicity, how far does it extend, where does responsibility for wrongdoing cease? You can all blame me for putting the idea in Bakchos’ mind; his knowledge of philosophy and my practical view of the world result in many discussions ranging somewhere between law, moral conduct and personal accountability. My mind is geared to science. An analytical ...

Read More »
Martens, Moti and the ‘rule of law’ in Australia

Martens, Moti and the ‘rule of law’ in Australia

Captain Fred Martens, whom I have written extensively about on Blak and Black in the past, was employed as a commercial pilot flying light aircraft within PNG and between PNG and Australia. In 2004 Captain Martens became a victim of Australian Federal Police (“AFP”) corruption and/or incompetence, which resulted in the loss of his business interests in PNG, the loss of his freedom (he was incarcerated for nearly 1,000 days ...

Read More »
Copper and gold: the blood diamonds of West Papua

Copper and gold: the blood diamonds of West Papua

Invaded by Indonesia in 1961, West Papua is the crisis on Australia’s doorstep. The conflict generated by the usurpation of the former Dutch protectorate is not recognized as anything other than a separatist movement by those in power in the international community, but it is so very much more. Since the Act of No Choice in 1969 in which 1025 West Papuans voted under extreme duress unanimously in favour of ...

Read More »
The Jayapura Five: Our choices and actions do affect the lives of others

The Jayapura Five: Our choices and actions do affect the lives of others

Little fly, Thy summer’s play My thoughtless hand Has brushed away. Am not I A fly like thee? Or art not thou A man like me? For I dance And drink and sing, Till some blind hand Shall brush my wing. If thought is life And strength and breath, And the want Of thought is death, Then am I A happy fly, If I live, Or if I die. William ...

Read More »
Racism in Australia's criminal justice system

Racism in Australia’s criminal justice system

The clock has been turned back on racial progress in America, though scarcely anyone seems to notice. All eyes are fixed on people like Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey who have defied the odds and achieved great power, wealth and fame Michelle Alexander Michelle Alexander former director of the Racial Justice Project of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) argues persuasively in her recent book The New Jim Crow: Mass ...

Read More »
Racism and the politics of power

Racism and the politics of power

Racial classification today is commonplace; people routinely catalogue each other as members of this or that race, and seem to assume that everyone can be thus classified Bernard Boxill, “Introduction” in Bernard Boxill, editor, Race and Racism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), 1. While Boxill’s statement is seemingly self-evident and benign, it’s very ordinariness conceals something much more sinister. Once we begin routinely cataloguing one another we leave open the ...

Read More »
Page 5 of 11« First...34567...10...Last »