Reconciliation - now is the time

Reconciliation – now is the time

I want to tell you a story about a woman, Born in the first quarter of the twentieth century in an indigenous community, Who knew life on the land, a traditional Indigenous life; When only a small child, she hid in the bush, one of a handful of survivors of a massacre in central New South Wales; Her mind is fading today, her daughter is gone, her ways are but ...

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Hypocrisy underscoring the ACT's Bill of Rights

Hypocrisy underscoring the ACT’s Bill of Rights

”Quite often before they get there they have done something quite serious. It becomes quite difficult because the offending behaviour is the first point that you’ve got to address and you can’t say that just because someone is Aboriginal they are excused from any criminal behaviour. Clearly that doesn’t work. You have to go back earlier, to why they are offending in the first place.” Chief Justice Terrence ...

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Monkey see, monkey do

Monkey see, monkey do

“Behead all those who insult the prophet!” So read the banner in Sydney on Saturday, in a protest ignited by a film released in the United States. Really, the lack of respect shown by the creators of the video and by the protestors are equally abysmal. One group insults another, the other feels it acceptable to damage the property of the place they have immigrated to and chosen to call ...

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Charity begins at home

Charity begins at home

Charity begins at home. Some agree, some do not. But the simple fact is that our treatment of those close to us sets the foundations for our behaviours toward others. Before we can love another, we must first learn to love ourselves. Within Buddhist doctrine is the practice of metta bhavana, or loving-kindness. It is a deeply spiritual and personal practice in which an individual progressively develops a sense of ...

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The real problem with hypocrisy – it knows no honour

The real problem with hypocrisy – it knows no honour

The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting. Milan Kundera One of the first Communist texts I read, following the French edition of Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-Tung, also known as, The Little Red Book, was Victor Hugo’s novel Les Miserables. For those purists among my colleagues who may object to me referring to Les Miserables as a Communist text, I offer the following in ...

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Cathal Lyons –V– the Hyenas of Capitalism

Cathal Lyons –V– the Hyenas of Capitalism

To penetrate the basic human predicament is more important than to fly to the moon Friedrich Durrenmatt Swiss-German playwright and novelist I’ve spent the last few days reading through the court documents relating to Mr Cathal Lyons ongoing saga with one of the world’s most powerful Hyenas of Capitalism, Ernst & Young (“E&Y”). Prior to his falling out with E&Y, Mr Lyons was Managing Partner of Operations and Chief Financial ...

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Ernst & Young, the slippery eel in the hands of the law

Ernst & Young, the slippery eel in the hands of the law

Business is no place for friends and it doesn’t matter if you’re in Canberra, London, New York or Moscow. Whilst Cathal Lyons as the Managing Partner of Operations and Chief Financial Officer of the Ernst & Young CIS Practice with his office in Moscow, probably knew this maxim, he learned the lesson first hand when he found himself marginalized by the Big4 accounting firm. The E&Y CIS Practice includes various ...

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Do as I say, don’t do as I do

Do as I say, don’t do as I do

I’ve debated about the title of this post, torn with an alternative following on from the statement in one’s Aboriginal heritage with a title that would allude to John Howard Griffin using his famous novel as the header, Black Like Me. But whilst I spend time with people of many colours and creeds on a daily basis, having not taken the path of Griffin or more recently John Saffran, I ...

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Call me black: Proud to be an Aborigine!

Call me black: Proud to be an Aborigine!

The following verse is to Jean-Michel Basquiat’s painting Jack Johnson, 1982 acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas. Jean-Michel Basquiat died at 27 years old from an overdose. He was the kind of artist who did not let you stand indifferent to his work; for some he was a genius, for others a junkie without talent. However, his paintings still change hands for millions of dollars. BLACK JACK: b. 31 March ...

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Ernst & Young, threats & intimidation

Ernst & Young, threats & intimidation

Yet another explanation needed by Ernst & Young … In the words of a renowned Australian xenophobe, please explain, Ernst & Young. First, you employ an Indigenous Australian man (aka ‘Pat’) to work in your Canberra office, having sourced him through your own recruiting head-hunter Tanya Taylor. He leaves of his own accord to return to the ACT Public Service. During his first tenure as an ACT Public Servant he ...

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Ernst and Young peddlers of falsity, destroyers of dreams

Ernst and Young peddlers of falsity, destroyers of dreams

Had I the heavens’ embroidered cloths, Enwrought of golden and silver light, The blue and the dim and the dark cloths Of night and light and the half-light, I would lay these cloths under your feet: But I, being poor, have only my dreams; I have spread my dreams under your feet; Tread softly because you tread on my dreams. Aedh wishes for the cloths of heaven, W.B. Yeats. Many, ...

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Mob rule and the ‘gentle’ nations of the West

Mob rule and the ‘gentle’ nations of the West

You can talk a mob into anything; its feelings may be – usually are – on the whole generous and right; but it has no foundation for them; you may tease or tickle it into any, at your pleasure; it thinks by infection, for the most part, catching an opinion like a cold, and there is nothing so little that it will not roar itself wild about, when the fit ...

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The great Aussie sporting culture’s hidden racist agenda

The great Aussie sporting culture’s hidden racist agenda

This post was penned in an outburst of indignation this morning after reading an article in the Sydney Morning Herald titled AFL clubs’ unwritten rule on Aborigines which discusses the AFL’s racist polices regarding Aboriginal recruitment. It draws some interesting parallels between the AFL, the ACT Government and Ernst & Young. I was going to title this post “asinus asino, et sus sui pulcher” but on reflection I guessed that the ...

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Silence no longer so golden

Silence no longer so golden

Complicity takes many forms, as discussed in posts by both Bakchos and me. Many believe that silent complicity is the least culpable, but to my mind if the silence enables the perpetrator of the wrongdoing to continue causing harm, then the silence is of a gross kind. An example of such silent complicity allowing continuing harm is described by Steven Miles generating discussion in both the Lancet and via his ...

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Theft and racism, the festering sores in Canberra

Theft and racism, the festering sores in Canberra

For some years now I have been considering the concept of complicity. What constitutes complicity, how far does it extend, where does responsibility for wrongdoing cease? You can all blame me for putting the idea in Bakchos’ mind; his knowledge of philosophy and my practical view of the world result in many discussions ranging somewhere between law, moral conduct and personal accountability. My mind is geared to science. An analytical ...

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Copper and gold: the blood diamonds of West Papua

Copper and gold: the blood diamonds of West Papua

Invaded by Indonesia in 1961, West Papua is the crisis on Australia’s doorstep. The conflict generated by the usurpation of the former Dutch protectorate is not recognized as anything other than a separatist movement by those in power in the international community, but it is so very much more. Since the Act of No Choice in 1969 in which 1025 West Papuans voted under extreme duress unanimously in favour of ...

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Genocide in West Papua, collective responsibility and the role of Ernst & Young

Genocide in West Papua, collective responsibility and the role of Ernst & Young

The TNI under Suharto was seen as different from other armies because: Indonesian army sees itself as quite different from other armies in the world, because it was never created as an instrument of the state, but was itself involved in the creation of the state. Thus the military considers itself the embodiment of Indonesian nationalism. In theory, it remains above the state, and technically does not consider itself answerable ...

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The masks we wear: Ernst & Young and global terrorism

The masks we wear: Ernst & Young and global terrorism

…the threats we face are no longer from known enemies, nations that have fleets or missiles or bombers that we can see come to the United States, nations that can be deterred through previous notions such as mutually assured destruction or any other previous defence notions. (Ari Fleischer former White House Press Secretary for U.S. President George W. Bush as reported on ABC AM Tuesday, 3 December, 2002) The new ...

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Ernst & Young and the Diversity Council of Australia

Ernst & Young and the Diversity Council of Australia

Employers have a legal responsibility to take ‘reasonable steps’ to prevent harassment and discrimination occurring in the workplace. Employers may also be held ‘vicariously liable’ for the actions of their partners, colleagues, employees, agents or contract workers. Employers must also ensure that people who make a complaint, or are involved in a complaint in any way, are not victimised or treated less favourably as a result. For an employer to ...

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Sticks and stones

Sticks and stones

Today’s news article that Dr. Charlie Teo addressed racism as part of his speech  to the Australia Day Council has raised hackles within the local community. Andrew Bolt and Steve Price, having interviewed the good doctor on radio and subsequently discussed the issue with callers, focused on language with no mention of the more brutal and marginalizing aspects of racist behaviour. We all see the world through the social and ...

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