AFP racism sparks diplomatic row between Australia and Vanuatu

AFP racism sparks diplomatic row between Australia and Vanuatu

On 2nd May, 2012 the Vanuatu Daily Post reported that Private Secretary in the Prime Minister’s Office Clarence Marae had been arrested at Sydney International Airport by the Australian Federal Police (“AFP”) whilst accompanying Vanuatu’s Prime Minister Meltek Sato Kilman Livtunvanu to Israel on a diplomatic mission. Following his arrest, Mr Marae was charged with conspiring to defraud the Commonwealth, contrary to section 86 (1) and 29D of the Crimes ...

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Portia’s Lament: Western greed and the death of the indigenous cultures of West Papua

Portia’s Lament: Western greed and the death of the indigenous cultures of West Papua

Fragments from the Alfoxden Notebook There he would stand In the still covert of some rock, Or gaze upon the moon until its light Fell like a strain of music on his soul And seemed to sink into his very heart. Why is it we feel So little for each other, but for this, That we with nature have no sympathy, Or with such things as we have no ...

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Anzac Day: Lest we forget

Anzac Day: Lest we forget

There is a battle going on in this country, one the majority would rather ignore. It is a battle for equality between anything to marks a person as not conforming to the mainstream. Like any war, the boundaries keep moving as allies are formed and concessions are made. We are, as a society nominally convinced of the right of each person to equal treatment, but when it comes to the ...

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Kieffen Raggett: A victim of the racist fog blurring Australia's consciousness

Kieffen Raggett: A victim of the racist fog blurring Australia’s consciousness

AQUÍ Mis pasos en esta calle Resuenan En otra calle Donde Oigo mis pasos Pasar en esta calle Donde Sólo es real la niebla. Octavio Paz – March 31, 1914 – April 19, 1998 was a Mexican writer, poet, and diplomat, and the winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize for Literature. Here My footsteps in the street Re-echo In another street Where I hear my footsteps Passing in this street ...

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The Hunger Games, contemporary spin on ancient tale

The Hunger Games, contemporary spin on ancient tale

My mind has been drawn to another of Rilke’s poems – Dreaming: This my labour: crowned by desire to wander the paths of days. Then sturdied, strong, send rootlet streamers down deep into life as I may — and through its pain mature far beyond it, and long past the end of time. I treated myself today to a luxury I rarely allow myself – a trip to the cinema, ...

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The Yindjibarndi lose a guiding light

The Yindjibarndi lose a guiding light

Blak and Black is saddened to hear of the passing of Yindjibarndi Elder Mr Ned Mayaringbungu Cheedy at the age of 105. Mr Cheedy was custodian of the Yindjibarndi stories which he endeavoured to pass onto successive generations and also took an active interest in the battle of the Yindjibarndi to protect their sacred lands from indiscriminate mining at the hands of Fortescue Mining Group. Blak and Black expresses out ...

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Fred Martens a political pawn on the checked board of fate and corruption

Fred Martens a political pawn on the checked board of fate and corruption

“Upon my feeble knee, I beg this boon, with tears, not lightly shed” of my regular readers for my tardiness in posting over the last few weeks. I have been travelling in Queensland collecting and collating statements from Indigenous Australians who have been victims of Australian Federal Police (“AFP”) racism and corruption. I also took this opportunity to collect another approximately nine hundred signatures on Black and Black’s petition calling ...

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Media, racism and manipulation

Media, racism and manipulation

Media have divided the working class and stereotyped young African-American males as gangsters or drug dealers. As a result of such treatment, the media have crushed youths’ prospects for future employment and advancement. The media have focused on the negative aspects of the black community (e.g. engaging in drug use, criminal activity, welfare abuse) while maintaining the cycle of poverty that the elite wants. Balkaran, S., 1999, The Yale Political ...

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Mob rule and the ‘gentle’ nations of the West

Mob rule and the ‘gentle’ nations of the West

You can talk a mob into anything; its feelings may be – usually are – on the whole generous and right; but it has no foundation for them; you may tease or tickle it into any, at your pleasure; it thinks by infection, for the most part, catching an opinion like a cold, and there is nothing so little that it will not roar itself wild about, when the fit ...

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Why Australia needs a Royal Commission into the AFP

Why Australia needs a Royal Commission into the AFP

On August 30 last year Blak and Black lodged a petition on the GoPetition website calling for a Royal Commission into the Australian Federal Police (“AFP”). Blak and Black has set out in detail the reasons why we believe a Royal Commission into the AFP is necessary. Without going into the minutiae of the issues raised by Blak and Black in its petition preamble, they all revolve around a core ...

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Vice-regal corruption: Australia and the UNSC

Vice-regal corruption: Australia and the UNSC

The Samoan Government has announced that Australian Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, will visit the country next week as part of a Pacific tour that also includes Nauru, Kiribati, Tuvalu, the Solomon Islands and New Caledonia. Ms Bryce will address Samoa’s parliament and call on Samoa’s head of state, Tui Atua Tupua Tamasese Efi. Her two days in Samoa has also been scheduled for a visit to SENESE, a school for people ...

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West Papua and the United Nations

West Papua and the United Nations

July of 1969 was a big month. Whilst the ‘civilized’ world was focused on the deployment of three men to the moon, Indonesia was finalizing steps to wrest control of the territory of West Papua from the United Nations, the former Dutch protectorate. I do not say wrest lightly, for it was in the so-called Act of Free Choice that in fact the people of West Papua were robbed of ...

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Aboriginal and White Australia: How The Cultures Clashed

Aboriginal and White Australia: How The Cultures Clashed

This post has been proferred by Imogen, a reader of Blak and Black. When the members of the First Fleet stepped off their cruise ships and on to Australian soil back in 1788, things changed forever. A group of Brits, convicts, sailors and officers, stepped off those ships after their arduous eight-month journey, and into the unknown. There were 1000 of them, plus animals, and each one of them was entirely alien ...

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Silence no longer so golden

Silence no longer so golden

Complicity takes many forms, as discussed in posts by both Bakchos and me. Many believe that silent complicity is the least culpable, but to my mind if the silence enables the perpetrator of the wrongdoing to continue causing harm, then the silence is of a gross kind. An example of such silent complicity allowing continuing harm is described by Steven Miles generating discussion in both the Lancet and via his ...

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Mohamad v. Palestinian Authority, the concept of corporate accountability

Mohamad v. Palestinian Authority, the concept of corporate accountability

This case arises from the petitioners’ claim that Azzam Rahim was detained, tortured, and killed by “the security forces of the Palestinian Authority” in late 1995, around the time the Palestinian Authority assumed responsibility for certain territories pursuant to internationally brokered peace agreements. The Palestinian Authority had its genesis in the 1993 Oslo Accords, in which Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (“PLO”) agreed that it was: time to put ...

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Corporate crimes against humanity a product of our global economy

Corporate crimes against humanity a product of our global economy

Crimes against humanity, torture, prolonged arbitrary detention, extrajudicial executions — all of those human rights norms are defined by actions. They’re not defined by whether the perpetrator is a human being or a corporation or another kind of entity. Paul Hoffman representing the 12 Nigerian petitioners in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum The issue in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum an issue central to the lives of many indigenous people ...

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Human dignity and the idea of justice, part 1

Human dignity and the idea of justice, part 1

The idea of human dignity consists in recognizing that man is a being that has ends proper to himself, his own ends, to be freely complied with by himself. Or putting it in other words, maybe clearer, man ought not to be treated as a mere means for ends which are not his own, which are strange or alien to him for ends which do not belong to him. Although ...

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Copper and gold: the blood diamonds of West Papua

Copper and gold: the blood diamonds of West Papua

Invaded by Indonesia in 1961, West Papua is the crisis on Australia’s doorstep. The conflict generated by the usurpation of the former Dutch protectorate is not recognized as anything other than a separatist movement by those in power in the international community, but it is so very much more. Since the Act of No Choice in 1969 in which 1025 West Papuans voted under extreme duress unanimously in favour of ...

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The Jayapura Five: Our choices and actions do affect the lives of others

The Jayapura Five: Our choices and actions do affect the lives of others

Little fly, Thy summer’s play My thoughtless hand Has brushed away. Am not I A fly like thee? Or art not thou A man like me? For I dance And drink and sing, Till some blind hand Shall brush my wing. If thought is life And strength and breath, And the want Of thought is death, Then am I A happy fly, If I live, Or if I die. William ...

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Racism in Australia's criminal justice system

Racism in Australia’s criminal justice system

The clock has been turned back on racial progress in America, though scarcely anyone seems to notice. All eyes are fixed on people like Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey who have defied the odds and achieved great power, wealth and fame Michelle Alexander Michelle Alexander former director of the Racial Justice Project of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) argues persuasively in her recent book The New Jim Crow: Mass ...

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