70 butchered Congolese: a small price to pay for our blood copper and silver!

70 butchered Congolese: a small price to pay for our blood copper and silver!

It will be a marvellous thing – the true personality of man – when we see it. It will grow naturally and simply, flower-like, or as a tree grows. It will not be at discord. It will never argue or dispute. It will not prove things. It will know everything. And yet it will not busy itself about knowledge. It will have wisdom. Its value will not be measured by ...

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Australia: a parable on authoritative oppression and the nature of conformity

Australia: a parable on authoritative oppression and the nature of conformity

I am not pessimistic. I just see everything as it is. When one lives in a society that is essentially not free, it is the obligation of every thinking person to attack obstacles to freedom in every way at his disposal… Jan Nemec – Director The Party and the Guests (O slavnosti a hostech) O slavnosti a hostech, is based on a novella by Ester Krumbachová. Krumbachová was an artist, ...

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“Friends” the new tovarisch in Julia Gillard speak

“Friends” the new tovarisch in Julia Gillard speak

You cannot believe how much you have to deceive a nation in order to govern it Adolf Hitler – Mein Kampf Has anybody else noticed how frequently Prime Minister Julia Gillard uses the word friends in her speeches? In fact, she used “friends” twenty-four times during the ALP Campaign Launch in Brisbane on August 16, 2010, coming from the mouth of Julia Gillard the word “friends” rings as hollow as ...

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Melanesia and Indigenous Australia: white privilege and the ‘rule of law’

Melanesia and Indigenous Australia: white privilege and the ‘rule of law’

Melanesia and Indigenous Australia: white privilege and the ‘rule of law’ … first, I made him know his Name should be Friday, which was the Day I sav’d his Life; I call’d him so for the Memory of the Time; I likewise taught him to say Master, and then let him know, that was to be my Name. Daniel Defoe (1719), Robinson Crusoe In the Nineteenth Century Robinson Crusoe gave ...

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Do as I say, don’t do as I do

Do as I say, don’t do as I do

I’ve debated about the title of this post, torn with an alternative following on from the statement in one’s Aboriginal heritage with a title that would allude to John Howard Griffin using his famous novel as the header, Black Like Me. But whilst I spend time with people of many colours and creeds on a daily basis, having not taken the path of Griffin or more recently John Saffran, I ...

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AFP racism sparks diplomatic row between Australia and Vanuatu

AFP racism sparks diplomatic row between Australia and Vanuatu

On 2nd May, 2012 the Vanuatu Daily Post reported that Private Secretary in the Prime Minister’s Office Clarence Marae had been arrested at Sydney International Airport by the Australian Federal Police (“AFP”) whilst accompanying Vanuatu’s Prime Minister Meltek Sato Kilman Livtunvanu to Israel on a diplomatic mission. Following his arrest, Mr Marae was charged with conspiring to defraud the Commonwealth, contrary to section 86 (1) and 29D of the Crimes ...

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Call me black: Proud to be an Aborigine!

Call me black: Proud to be an Aborigine!

The following verse is to Jean-Michel Basquiat’s painting Jack Johnson, 1982 acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas. Jean-Michel Basquiat died at 27 years old from an overdose. He was the kind of artist who did not let you stand indifferent to his work; for some he was a genius, for others a junkie without talent. However, his paintings still change hands for millions of dollars. BLACK JACK: b. 31 March ...

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Ernst & Young, threats & intimidation

Ernst & Young, threats & intimidation

Yet another explanation needed by Ernst & Young … In the words of a renowned Australian xenophobe, please explain, Ernst & Young. First, you employ an Indigenous Australian man (aka ‘Pat’) to work in your Canberra office, having sourced him through your own recruiting head-hunter Tanya Taylor. He leaves of his own accord to return to the ACT Public Service. During his first tenure as an ACT Public Servant he ...

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Die Sünde ist ein Versinken in das Nichts

Die Sünde ist ein Versinken in das Nichts

Du bist der Arme, du der Mittellose Du bist der Arme, du der Mittellose, du bist der Stein, der keine Stätte hat, du bist der fortgeworfene Leprose, der mit der Klapper umgeht vor der Stadt. Denn dein ist nichts, so wenig wie des Windes, und deine Blöße kaum bedeckt der Ruhm; das Alltagskleidchen eines Waisenkindes ist herrlicher und wie ein Eigentum. Du bist so arm wie eines Keimes Kraft in ...

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Fred Martens a political pawn on the checked board of fate and corruption

Fred Martens a political pawn on the checked board of fate and corruption

“Upon my feeble knee, I beg this boon, with tears, not lightly shed” of my regular readers for my tardiness in posting over the last few weeks. I have been travelling in Queensland collecting and collating statements from Indigenous Australians who have been victims of Australian Federal Police (“AFP”) racism and corruption. I also took this opportunity to collect another approximately nine hundred signatures on Black and Black’s petition calling ...

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Aux objets répugnants nous trouvons des appas

Aux objets répugnants nous trouvons des appas

While travelling the highways and byways of Queensland taking statements in support of my application to the United Nations alleging ongoing and systematic human rights violations against Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (“ATSI”) people by the Australian Federal Police, the Australian Government and the Australian Capital Territory Government, I had pause to read and reflect on Charles Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du mal. Within Baudelaire’s verses one comes across his ...

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Mob rule and the ‘gentle’ nations of the West

Mob rule and the ‘gentle’ nations of the West

You can talk a mob into anything; its feelings may be – usually are – on the whole generous and right; but it has no foundation for them; you may tease or tickle it into any, at your pleasure; it thinks by infection, for the most part, catching an opinion like a cold, and there is nothing so little that it will not roar itself wild about, when the fit ...

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Why Australia needs a Royal Commission into the AFP

Why Australia needs a Royal Commission into the AFP

On August 30 last year Blak and Black lodged a petition on the GoPetition website calling for a Royal Commission into the Australian Federal Police (“AFP”). Blak and Black has set out in detail the reasons why we believe a Royal Commission into the AFP is necessary. Without going into the minutiae of the issues raised by Blak and Black in its petition preamble, they all revolve around a core ...

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Vice-regal corruption: Australia and the UNSC

Vice-regal corruption: Australia and the UNSC

The Samoan Government has announced that Australian Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, will visit the country next week as part of a Pacific tour that also includes Nauru, Kiribati, Tuvalu, the Solomon Islands and New Caledonia. Ms Bryce will address Samoa’s parliament and call on Samoa’s head of state, Tui Atua Tupua Tamasese Efi. Her two days in Samoa has also been scheduled for a visit to SENESE, a school for people ...

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Corruption and accountability: the AFP in the Asia/Pacific region

Corruption and accountability: the AFP in the Asia/Pacific region

The criminal justice system consists of three main parts: (1) Legislative (create laws); (2) adjudication (courts); and (3) corrections (prisons, probation, parole, fines, community service). In a criminal justice system, these distinct agencies operate together both under the rule of law and as the principal means of maintaining the rule of law within society. The first contact an alleged offender usually has with the criminal justice system is the police ...

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An ‘Ethics Commissioner’ without ethics: welcome to Australia

An ‘Ethics Commissioner’ without ethics: welcome to Australia

Yesterday, Thursday I received a phone call from Captain Fred Martens, the man who spent a 1,000 days in jail, having been wrongly convicted of an offence under Australia’s Child Sex Tourism Laws. His conviction was later quashed by the Queensland Court of Appeal (“QCA”). At all times Captain Martens has maintained his innocence. Captain Martens has further maintained that he was a victim of a corrupt Australian Federal Police ...

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Theft and racism, the festering sores in Canberra

Theft and racism, the festering sores in Canberra

For some years now I have been considering the concept of complicity. What constitutes complicity, how far does it extend, where does responsibility for wrongdoing cease? You can all blame me for putting the idea in Bakchos’ mind; his knowledge of philosophy and my practical view of the world result in many discussions ranging somewhere between law, moral conduct and personal accountability. My mind is geared to science. An analytical ...

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Martens, Moti and the ‘rule of law’ in Australia

Martens, Moti and the ‘rule of law’ in Australia

Captain Fred Martens, whom I have written extensively about on Blak and Black in the past, was employed as a commercial pilot flying light aircraft within PNG and between PNG and Australia. In 2004 Captain Martens became a victim of Australian Federal Police (“AFP”) corruption and/or incompetence, which resulted in the loss of his business interests in PNG, the loss of his freedom (he was incarcerated for nearly 1,000 days ...

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Corporate crimes against humanity a product of our global economy

Corporate crimes against humanity a product of our global economy

Crimes against humanity, torture, prolonged arbitrary detention, extrajudicial executions — all of those human rights norms are defined by actions. They’re not defined by whether the perpetrator is a human being or a corporation or another kind of entity. Paul Hoffman representing the 12 Nigerian petitioners in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum The issue in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum an issue central to the lives of many indigenous people ...

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Racism in Australia's criminal justice system

Racism in Australia’s criminal justice system

The clock has been turned back on racial progress in America, though scarcely anyone seems to notice. All eyes are fixed on people like Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey who have defied the odds and achieved great power, wealth and fame Michelle Alexander Michelle Alexander former director of the Racial Justice Project of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) argues persuasively in her recent book The New Jim Crow: Mass ...

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